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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 212 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 4:00pm EDT
for a month. this incredibly active man felt like a caged animal. so at the very moment the soviet union intended to change the balance of power in the middle east eisenhower was out of commission. secretary of state john foster dulles was on his own, unable to consult with the president as he normally did. let us bury once and for all the myth that ellis ran american foreign policy in the eisenhower years. everyone close to both men, and i have talked with a number of them, knew that eisenhower was in charge. like eisenhower right eisenhower was out of the white house for three and a half months except two nights on his way to recuperate at gettysburg. , number two is the one that the heart patient so restricted to his other activities, whether he should run for a second term in 1956. i am satisfied that he always intended to run. in the age of roosevelt you had to have a second term to be a great president, and i wanted to be a great president. the heart attack raised the enormous question of whether physically he could run. he repeatedly discussed possible successors. none of cone had
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 7:45am EDT
actually got through. that call was important to. build is concerned -- confronted the soviet union had made an arms deal with each appeared ike knew this would open a new chapter in the cold war and they agreed the president should send a message to the soviet premier nikolai boudin. at the present want to think about it overnight. he told dulles you would call him the following morning. that phone call was never made. ike went back to golf, his game history. as the day wore on the present experience discomfort. he declined issues with evening drink, had little appetite for dinner and retired early. and in the middle of the night, ike appeared by train to spitzer. i've got a pain across the lower part of my chest, he said. since a complaint early about indigestion, mamie gave her husband milk of magnesia. at 2:54 a.m. mamie called the presence physician who rushed to the white house. he initially put out the word that this was a digestive upset when he knew it was a massive heart attack. he waited until midafternoon that day before transporting the president to the army hospital. even
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 8:00pm EDT
union in 1933? >> at that point, we had not yet recognized the soviet union officially. recognition followed soon after that. we were not exactly -- we were not opponents. we are not necessarily the best of friends. it was fairly status quo. martha continued her alliance with her soviet intelligence as best as anyone could tell she tended to be more talk than action. that is my appraisal. when the comet hunters -- the commie hunters started heating up in congress, they called her up and her husband to testify. her husband was offered stern, not a character in the book. they fled to mexico. they led a very capitalist lifestyle. but they were self exiled from america. eventually realizing that they became disillusioned over communism in prague. >> but they were agents. >> you have to define a dense. >> both of them. >> -- you have to define agents. >> both of them. >> they were managed apparently by case officers with the kgb. but, again, what they actually did not all what kind of intelligence they provided is not at all clear, whether they provided anything material in a way that in
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 8:00pm EDT
to eisenhower that the soviet union had made an arms deal with egypt. he knew that this move would offer a new chapter in the cold war and they agreed that the president should send a message to the soviet premier nikolai bulganin. but the president wanted to think about it overnight. he told him he would call him the following morning. that phone call was never made. ike went back to golf, but his game deteriorated. as the day wore on the president experienced growing discomfort and declined his usual evening drink, have little appetite for dinner and retired early and in the middle of the night, ike appeared by mimi's bedside. i have a team across the lower part of my chest, he said. since he complained earlier about in digestion, mimi gave her husband milk of magnesia. at 2:54 a.m., she called dr. howard snyder, the president's physician who rushed to the white house. slider initially put out the word that this was a digestive upset when he knew it was a massive heart attack. he waited until midafternoon that day before transporting the president to the fitzsimmons are and he had walked to
FOX News
Jul 23, 2011 12:00pm PDT
the soviet union. now our troops in the middle east will create islands of freedom. no, says thaddeus russell. how do i have it wrong. >> in general american military intervention has increased and hardened repressive regimes. on the other hand, american popular culture, in many cases have done more for liberation and for national security. >> john: let's talk about the soviet union. my understanding that it was reagan's military build-up and they collapsed? >> it collapsed from within. it didn't collapse from without. there was not an invasion. what happened in the soviet union and in eastern bloc is people walked away from the ideology of communism. that happened when jazz and rock and roll infiltrated those countries after world war ii. >> john: evidence? >> american soldiers brought jazz during world war ii to the eastern front. soviet soldiers brought it back. they brought it and spread it across the countries and then on the streets all over the soviet union and big cities and eastern europe, you saw these kids on the streets, in the soviet union they were kids would re jeans and listen
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 2:00pm EDT
the breakpoint in history. the collapse of the soviet union is what happened on that day. and the birth of the post-soviet era, not only in american foreign policy but in terms of literally rewriting the map of the world as we knew it. two decades later we're going to mark the anniversary this year. things haven't necessary turned out as some of the optimists would have had them. we have not seen a tidal wave of democracy and freedom wash across central asia and the caucasus and russia itself, quite the contrary. resurgence of nationalism. new conflicts break out. we've seen really tempered expectations when it comes to what kind of political economic and social system is going to be existing across the soviet union. i want to walk through your map of the world two decades after the collapse. you have some views that are very controversial, that are making some unexpected, or perhaps predictions that some of our readers will necessarily know what to make up. russia itself, tell me where you see russia headed in the next decade. >> guest: russia is russia. it is not a copy at the jfk sch
FOX News
Jul 24, 2011 2:00am PDT
concentration camps. 45 years later the threat of our military buildup defeated the soviet union and now our troops in the middle east will help create islands of freedom. no says historian thaddeus russell, i have it wrong. so, how do i have it wrong? >> well, as a matter of fact in general, american military intervention has increased anti-americanism and hardened repressive regimes. american popular culture, often called the worst of our culture has done more for our liberation and national security than anything the airborne could do. >> john: let's talk about the soviet union. the reagan military buildup. they spent so much they collapsed. >> they collapsed from within, didn't collapse from outside, there was never an invasion, what happened in the soviet union and eastern block, people walked away from the ideology of commune inch and that began especially when american popular culture, jazz and rock and roll infiltrated those countries after world war ii. >> john: evidence? >> evidence? american soldiers brought jazz during world war ii to the eastern front. soviet soldiers brought it
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 1:30am EDT
to point to the fact that ronald reagan brought down the soviet union by making it spend its way and bankruptcy, and they cannot spend much money that the government and nation essentially what wrote. you don't hear conservatives making that point very often these days. and the reason is because principle applies right here in the united states as well. and everybody is becoming aware of the problem. at the future for freedom foundation we've been saying this is a fact wrote this country is headed down. this is the fact that the government advocates, advocates of the u.s. empire, the welfare state taken our nation doing controlled spending, debt, inflation and all that comes with it. sure enough that's where we are. people figure out finally bit the big spending problem is a big problem in the united states and are starting to realize comes from the award for weight and the welfare state. and the big spending has consequences. we see it in terms of violations of financial privacy and in terms a voracious government that can't bear enough. we see it ironically enough from the gove
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 8:00pm EDT
, including some to china and the soviet union. ladies and gentlemen, ed cox. >> david, thank you very much. it is a pleasure to be here for this forum. i would like to lead off by setting the stage about the values that president nixon held here and was a part of his make up that those values that were at the basis of everything that he did. to do that, i am going to read eulogy inor dole's 1994 for president nixon. senator dole, said, i believe the second half of that ever collect 20th-century will be known as the age of nixon. he always embodied the deepest feelings of the people he led. one of his biography said nixon was one of us/ for those among you who are wondering who that was, that was tom wicker, but he said richard nixon was one of us, and so he was, said senator dole. tens of millions of his countrymen, he was an american hero who shared their belief in working hard, worshiping god, loving families, and saluting the flag. he called them the silent majority. like that he valued accomplishment more than ideology. they wanted the government to do the decent thing, but not to bank
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 11:00pm EDT
and the soviet union. ladies and gentlemen, ed cox. >> david, thank you very much. it is a pleasure to be here for this forum. i would like to lead off by setting the stage about the values that president nixon held here and was a part of his make up that those values that were at the basis of everything that he did. to do that, i am going to read eulogy inor dole's 1994 for president nixon. senator dole, said, i believe the second half of that ever collect 20th-century will be known as the age of nixon. he always embodied the deepest feelings of the people he led. one of his biography said nixon was one of us/ for those among you who are wondering who that was, that was tom wicker, but he said richard nixon was one of us, and so he was, said senator dole. tens of millions of his countrymen, he was an american hero who shared their belief in working hard, worshiping god, loving families, and saluting the flag. he called them the silent majority. like that he valued accomplishment more than ideology. they wanted the government to do the decent thing, but not to bankrupt the nation. they wanted
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 8:00pm EDT
. nixon many foreign trips, including some to china, the far east, the soviet union and russian. ladies and gentlemen, ed cox. [applause] >> those values were the basis of everything that he did. to do that i am going to read from senator dole's eulogy in 1994 for president nixon. senator dole said i believe that the second half of the 20th century will be known as the age of nixon. why was he the most durable figure of our time? because he always embodied the deepest feelings of the people led. one of his biographies said that richard nixon was one of us. for those among you who are wondering who that was, that was tom wicker, no great nixon fan. but he said richard nixon was one of us, and so he was, said senator dole. to tens of millions of countrymen, richard nixon was an american hero who shared their beliefs in working hard, worshiping god, loving their families and saluting the flag. he called them the silent majority. like him, they valued accomplishment more than ideology. they wanted the government to do the decent thing, but not to bankrupt the nation. they wanted its protect
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 10:45pm EDT
to recognize the soviet union. 16 years, four presidencies, the last major -- i think ireland is the last to recognize. what a contrast. why? my explanation and i think it is the only one that makes sense is we saw in the communist ideologies a rise to our own. no longer according to the soviets in the vanguard of history this was not a species of the americana. this was a whole new soviet genius all together, and there was a threat. the same kind of desperation as our own. so the conflict between the soviet union and the united states is really an intellectual one from the very beginning, not just competing market society but the fact we are faced with a letter of ideologies that was comprehensive and universal as our own and the cold war really begins 1917. now there's a bullet through the wall because nazi germany represented a much more serious threat it seemed, but quickly back after the war and you know, some of you of a certain age will remember president kennedy's inaugural address to pay any price, bear any burden on behalf of liberty. that's a cold war address and why we won and
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 8:30pm EDT
be shocked to know 1957 the soviet union was the first country to put a ballistic missile in the air in the first country to put a satellite into outer space. but after launching the first intercontinental ballistic missile, the soviets common name the about nikita khrushchev who was their leader at the time, who lied to the american people and the american leadership and tried to give us the impression that they had a huge advantage in missiles over the united states. they did not have a huge advantage. we could not tell the balance of power because we did not have overhead satellites at the time to look down and counted the missiles. when they said they had a lot of missiles most people assumed that was true. of course, they didn't but it spurred us to build many missiles and therefore when president kennedy came to office 1961 thinking there was a missile gap in favor of the soviet union we discovered is that there was but it favored us because they were lying and did not have that many and of course, we respond to the lies to build a rather large arsenal. that is the case of one
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 7:45pm EDT
major state in the world to recognize the soviet union. 16 years, four presidencies, i think ireland was the last that we are the last major state to recognize the soviet union. what a contrast. why? by explanation and i think it is the only one that makes sense, is that we saw in the communist ideology a rival to our own. we were no longer according to the soviets in the vanguard of history. this was not a species of the genus, the the revolutionary genus americanus. this was a hold of the soviet genus altogether and that was a threat. the same kind of universal aspirations of our own. so the conflict between the soviet union and the united states is really an intellectual one from the very beginning. not just competing market societies but the fact that we were faced with a rifle ideology that was as comprehensive and as universalist as our own. and the cold war really begins in 1917. now there is a blip through the war because nazi germany represented a much more serious threat and it seemed we were quickly back after the war. and some of you of a certain age remember president ke
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 8:00am EDT
, or when the soviet union was removed, suddenly all the various parts began fighting with one another. he would have said, of course. once you remove this authority from the top down, then these various ethnicities, these various differences are going to come to the fore, and they make democracy very difficult because people have to willingly surrender some of their selfish interests. and that's not easy to do. the founders would have been, and they became very pessimistic about the ability of other peoples to become democratic. they thought the french were following them ten years later, and, of course, many french leaders thought so too. i mean, lafayette who was at the outset, one of the leaders of the french revolution in 1789, he sent the key to the bass teen -- the bastille being the prison. july 14th is still celebrated as the beginning of the french revolution, he sent that key to george washington, and it hangs today in mount vernon. that was his way of saying to washington, you americans are responsible for our revolution, and the americans assumed that. that they were responsib
Comedy Central
Jun 30, 2011 11:30pm PDT
used to be afraid of the soviet union and china at the same time. >> right. >> stephen: are we in the west, are we anything any more? is there a west if there isn't an oppositional force in the soviet union to define us? >> well, there isn't the west in the sense we had it during the cold war when the unites states states and western europe basically always got together. because we had a common enemy. >> stephen: right. >> and that's not the way it is now. obama's first thought is not, even bill bill clinton's was what am i going to do with europe it might be india or china or indonesia. the same is true of many european countries too. we may be looking to china and india first. >> stephen: you say that obama doesn't have an east west outlook. he has more of a north south. >> right. >> stephen: what dow mean by north south outlook. >> what i just said, that he --. >> stephen: but again when i ask questions it means i generally don't understand. >> he does not instinctively look to europe. and obama himself says in his autobiography that he doesn't have that same personal emotio
CBS
Jul 22, 2011 4:00am PDT
gregarian went to space and round one get to the soviet union. >> one small step for man -- >> eight years later, the u.s. evens the score by putting a man on the moon. >> but the cost of this race helped bankrupt the soviet union and end the cold war. only america could afford to go on building space shuttles. the russians stuck with a 1960s era soyuz. >> i don't think we could have a more dependable alternative than we have right now with the soyuz. >> dependable, yes, and a monopoly, which lets the russians charge nasa $60 million a ride. there are undercurrents of resentment at nasa that america's space program is now hostage to russian technology. >> you hear that? >> yes, yes, absolutely. >> does it make you mad? >> no, i think it's political. >> starved for money for most of the '90s, the dilapidated space program seemed to prove they lost the space race. selling seats on the soyuz for american astronauts at least lets them call it a draw. elizabeth palmer, cbs news, moscow. >>> coming up on "the early show," from the frying pan to the fire, the latest on the deadly record-setting h
CBS
Jul 21, 2011 5:30pm PDT
especially for visiting americans. he was an air force officer back when the u.s. and the then- soviet union were battling for space supremacy. >> i was a fighter pilot back when the cold war was still going on and if anybody had told me back then when i was flying f-15s that i would be living with my family in russia i'd have never believed them in a million years. >> reporter: 1957, the soviets launched the sputnik satellite and the space race. >> the first man in space. >> reporter: four years later, cosmonaut yuri gagarin went into orbit and round one went to the soviet union. >> that's one small step for man... >> reporter: eight years later, though, the u.s. evened up the score by putting a man on the moon. but the astronomical costs of this race helped bankrupt the soviet union and end the cold war. only america could afford to go on building space shuttles. the russians stuck with the 1960s-era soyuz, which did bring cady coleman safely back to earth just last month. does it make you uneasy that there's no plan "b" anymore? it's the soyuz or nothing? >> i don't think we could have a
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 3:00pm EDT
. it's an analogy of what area 51 is. it was set up to conduct espionage on the soviet union. the cia began building its base there in 1955 with the u-2 spy plane because the cia want the to spay on russia and see what they were doing, and one of the other men that i interviewed in my book was herbie stockman, and he just passed two months ago -- an interesting side note that the men i interviewed are really in the last chapter of their lives -- but herbie explained to me what it was like to be the first man to fly over the soviet union in a u-2, and yesage traited crus chef and there was a lot of spying going on, but at the same time, what herbie stockman brought back in the film canisters of his u-2 was over 200,000 square -- 400,000 square feet of spy footage of what was going on in the soviet union. the cia was able to learn and understand that, in fact, the soviets were not lining up for world war iii as many members of the air force wanted to believe. certainly general lemay, a character in the book. you might call him an antagonist. when you think of the cia's job to bring info
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2011 8:00am EDT
which france's gary powers took off for his mission over the soviet union and got shot down. only to have the soviet union threaten us with retaliation because he took off from a base in pakistan without there being any american commitment actually to be there to protect us against that retaliation if that occurred. those are pieces of history. americans are a great nation, and i've said this. you know that this is my little cliche, but i'm going to repeat it anyway because sometimes cliches are good. and that is that americans do a lot of things very well. america is a great nation which has contributed immensely to human progress, the idea of liberty, freedom, the idea of democracy, modern capitalism, globalization, everything. and then, of course, more than any other nation in this at least the last 200 years, all of that is great. but there's one thing that americans don't do -- in fact, there's two things americans don't do well. one is history. the american attitude is, you know, joe? he's history. [laughter] or as henry ford said once, you know, all history's bunk, you know
CSPAN
Jul 2, 2011 11:00pm EDT
americans would be shocked to know that in 1957 the soviet union was the first country to number one put a ballistic missile in the air, and number two, the first country to put a satellite in outer space. but after launching the first intercontinental ballistic missile, the soviets and here we are talking mostly about nikita khrushchev would be a leader at the time allotted to the american people and lied to the american leadership and tried to give us the impression that there was a missile gap that they had a huge a advantage in missiles over the united states. in fact they did not have a huge of feige of missiles. we couldn't tell what the balance of power was regarding missiles because we didn't have overhead satellite at the time that could look down in the soviet union and count their muscles so when they told us they have lots of missiles most people assumed that that was true. of course they didn't have an advantage in missiles but what it did is it spurred us to build many missiles and therefore, when president kennedy came to office in 61 thinking there was a missile gap in fa
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 11:00am EDT
. the purpose was to stop the soviet union from invading europe. in fact, the best description i have ever heard of nato -- and some of you may have heard this -- was by its first secretary general who was asked by the reporter, what is nato for? and said nato is to keep the russians out, the germans down, and the americans and. in one sentence he encapsulated the entire purpose of what nato was. so common data goes through the cold war. we end the cold war without nato firing a shot. the soviet union collapses. then the question was what to do with nato. in those times -- and by the way, for this book i talked to over 50 people on both sides of the atlantic. i talked to probably all of the key military leaders from the european union. a lot of the political and military folks here in the united states. that is the background of the research that i have been doing for this book. so, anyway, the soviet union collapses. we still have made no. the question was, what should we do with them? and in that time people just didn't think it through. what they wanted to do was make sure that all these newl
FOX News
Jul 16, 2011 12:00am PDT
the former soviet union, including the ukraine, most of the best prostitutes in america are here. >> don't say that. >> they are! go to any high class bar. >> i can give uh number. >> is this why you have to leave early tonight? >> no, i have something else i have to do. i don't understand this morality. when did this happen? my generation never bought into this stuff. i came up with a perfect period. after the pill and before aids. therefore condoms didn't exist. they were unnecessary. you just needed 20 shots for vaw their y'all disease. >> 8300 young people contracted hiv in 2009. what do you say about that? >> it is terrible. now you have to make me feel bad. >> you have to wrap it up. >> okay, i'm sorry they contracted that. it is terrible. it is too bad it didn't have it when i brought up. >> the reason they got it was everybody before was having too much fun, right? >> are you asking me that question? >> i don't know. >> it is a lousy question. go ahead. >> bill, you consider your right hand a friend with benefits. >> and its name is mila. >> i'm sure you endorsed the practice be
PBS
Jul 28, 2011 11:00pm PDT
one, what i was thinking about-- even though it collapsed for her reasons l-- was the soviet union in afghanistan >> ah, yes. and that is a very important part of "the haunting legacy" because chapter 3 with carter and really right up through with reagan and bush one, vietnam and afghanistan have been sort of intellectually married and why do i say that? because zbigniew brzezinski whom you know very well and has undoubtedly many on this program many times, brzezinski when he wasnational security advisor to prident carter, we were very fortunate. we got ahold of hisecret wall streeting memos to carter about what he thought carter ought to do in foreign policy. zbigniew brzezinski actually had in his mind that if we could suck the russians in more deeply into afghanistan we could create what he called heir vietnam." and in his mind, that kind of a loss, soviet troops in humiliation, having to leave afghanistan to go back to the soviet union loaded up with drugs, terrible shape, the equipment absolutely destroyed, they went back and in spig's mind, this could lead to the disintegrati
PBS
Jul 20, 2011 12:30am PDT
, there were more closely linked to the soviet union. meetings between senior government officials are quite routine signifying the importance of both countries really putting on this relationship. america wants closer business ties. it wants greater access to this giant and fast-growing economy. there is also a possible will work against china. its roots to the talks table on global affairs. the fact that she is here is really the most important fishing at all. we have had no great announcements and no great agreements, but she is here and that is incredibly of horton. >> about a week from the mound by attacks. how has that changed the agenda? >> counter-terrorism and regional security are very important issues for both countries, particularly with some many u.s. troops in afghanistan and involved with pakistan. hillary clinton said that following those attacks that left 20 people that, terrorism was on everybody's mind. we heard from both her and her indian counterpart announced a greater degree of cooperation in counter-terrorism and intelligence sharing between the security agencies. >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 212 (some duplicates have been removed)